4 Easy Steps or 15 Seconds?


My first stop in preparing for the ‘changing the keys’ project was YouTube. I found two videos. The Official Kwikset video claimed the lock could be re-keyed in 4 easy steps. Weeeeellll that’s a bit of a stretch. The really important note of leaving the door open and making sure you had another way to access your living spaces was a really good one.

“Re-keying in 15 seconds even with a bad key” posted by Mr. Hardware seemed promising. I really like the soothing quality of his voice as he uses a sing-song tone to walk the view through the processes steps.

I’m not good at this stuff, and I have the barrier of not liking it. I knew that 4 easy steps sounded too good to be true and 15 seconds didn’t seem likely. I learned a little bit from both, I felt pretty prepared. To be on the safe side, I watched both videos and took my own notes documenting each, what some people might think to be intuitive step, and came up with 12 Steps. In case someone found this post by googling re-keying kwikset locks, I’ll list them here. They are a combination of what I learned from watching the office video and the very helpful and non-shaming Mr. Hardware:

  1. Keep Door open – make sure you have another way to get into the house
  2. The lock should be in the ‘locked’ position. Both the top and the bottom.
  3. Insert current key
  4. Turn 90 degrees to 3:00 o’clock.
  5. Insert pin fully and firmly into hole while the original key is in the lock
  6. Remove pin first – before removing current key
  7. Remove current key
  8. Insert new key

(make sure new key is fully inserted. Edge of key touches the face of the lock)

  1. Without pushing or pulling rotate to 180 degrees (counter clockwise) to 9:00 o’clock
  2. Rotate new key again to 3:00 o’clock
  3. Pull the key to make sure it will NOT come out in this position. If it comes out at 3:00 o’clock something is wrong.
  4. Turn back to starting position. Lock is now rekeyed, new key should work.

 

Did it work as easily as 4 easy steps and 15 seconds promised? Not exactly. Stay tuned and I’ll post an update.

 

 

 

Education vs. Learning

I recently took a course in renewable energy at NYU. As I signed up for the course I received 20 or so emails containing different promotional announcements. After the first email which provided the details of the course, I did not open the remaining 19 or so messages. This is unfortunate for me as one of the emails contained the syllabus that listed the pre-reading for the course. I received that email the day before directly from the instructor. I spent the entire day consuming hundreds of pages of data. This oversight was my error, I just didn’t have the time to filter through the emails to determine which ones were relevant to me and which emails contained information that I might want to review at some time.

It was also announced in one of the unread emails that NYU would be changing their certification course program, eliminating certifications now calling the courses Career Advancement Courses. I loved it. After one or two courses I would have enough information and connections in the any given field to pursue my interest in that field. If I want to or if it’s necessary I can pursue an advanced degree in this discipline. As is true with any change, many students did not value the certification and many were disappointed that the certifications was being eliminated.

Gift vintage certificate / diploma / award border template in vector

I congratulate NYU for taking this bold move. If a university the caliber of NYU has the courage to make such a decision, others will follow. That’s impressive leadership. NYU made this decision by evaluating the data of students that took their courses. They learned most took one or two courses but did not complete the certification. Non-certification courses are also less expensive and more accessible to a wider audience. The goal of the courses is career advancement, so they decided to call the classes what they are: career advancement courses.

As I work on large, complex transformations business architects assess the resources of: People, Processes, Technology and Information. (PPTI) When evaluating the resources of the People we have today and the talent we need to implement a transformation, education and certifications can become a barrier. The current staff, while functioning adequately, may not have the required education. If they are not functioning sufficiently and need to develop new skills quickly the time it takes to earn a certification or advanced degree is just not agile enough for the goals of the project or to remain competitive. The available talent pool may not have the required formal education but might have transferable skills.

When we do find the talent that meets all criteria they may not want to do the tedious work that is necessary as it may be vastly different to the reward and experiences they had in academia. Compensation may not be available to adequately counterbalance the investment the student has made in their education. While the candidates may have the education required, they may not have the skill further delaying progress.

There is a gap.

Victor Saad created his own solution to the large investment in education and the lack of guaranteed employment as result of the education in the Leap Year Project. This is not an accredited program yet but I hope one day it will be. Mr. Saad is sharing his process with the creation of the Experience Institute.

Why do we now rely so much on education and certifications? My view is it is the path of least resistance. When hundreds maybe thousands of resumes are received for a position it’s easy to electronically cull the universe and make it more manageable by dismissing any resume that does not have the required education. It also, on the surface, relieves the responsibility of hiring managers and leaders of critically assessing talent and being accountable for their results.

What talent are we not considering by relying on education alone? Those over the age of 50 that have had long-term careers? Those that have worked in non-competing industries in similar functions? Veterans that have skill, discipline and leadership skills that are needed but don’t easily translate? Those educated outside of the country that have the skill but their education is not accepted in the US?

It would require time, leadership, communication skills and critical thinking to evaluate the current and potential resources of People.

Some will argue with me that there are laws that prohibit them from considering other talent and they cannot incur the legal risk. This is sometimes true but not always true. My opinion is we do not allocate enough time to hire talent. Once we do hire, we are reluctant to have uncomfortable conversations and invest in those we recruited so diligently.

If we recognize the accurate amount of time it takes to recruit and to develop people as well as having the courage to have uncomfortable conversations; we will readily identify we are surrounded by a pool of potential talent.