Things that appear to be the same, may not be exactly the same

So, I followed the 12 easy steps I outlined for myself after watching the ‘4 easy steps’ and the ’15 second process’ outlined by the man in the soothing sing song calming voice. And it almost worked. Thinking I would be smart (almost always backfires on me) I found an envelope of keys that I’ve used previously and found two keys that looked exactly alike. I re-keyed the lock to fit the new key. Then for extra measure I tried it with the second (I thought) identical key and now I locked the lock. Apparently the keys looked alike but were not exactly alike.

Defeated, not being able to re-key this lock after hours of time investment, I call my very talented, eager-to-help upstairs tenant. Turns out in his career of many paths, he worked at Menards at one time. Menards sent the Associates to a class on re-keying locks. I had an expert right upstairs but instead decided to try myself. He pointed out that the keys were not the same and also now my lock was ruined.

He suggested I go and buy a new lock. He pointed out that as good and as convenient that the Kwikset locks are, they are only good for 100 turns. It had been over a year since I changed the locks, it was probably passed it’s lifespan. Neither of my videos or any of my research pointed out this fact, although it felt true.

I asked if I should proactively change the lock that works and I was advised ‘no’. That doesn’t feel right, but it’s advice I get a lot. I prefer when things work and believe it or not, I really like efficiency. I’m dreading when I get the phone call that the ‘lock doesn’t work’ but now that I know it’s only good for 100 turns and the lock is passed it’s lifespan, I’ll just wait for the call.

When I get the call, I won’t assume that the process I followed here will be the ‘right’ process. It will likely be a year or so into the future when I get the call. Who knows what solutions will be available then?

I am sad though that all the locks passed their 100-turn lifespan will sit in a landfill.

4 Easy Steps or 15 Seconds?


My first stop in preparing for the ‘changing the keys’ project was YouTube. I found two videos. The Official Kwikset video claimed the lock could be re-keyed in 4 easy steps. Weeeeellll that’s a bit of a stretch. The really important note of leaving the door open and making sure you had another way to access your living spaces was a really good one.

“Re-keying in 15 seconds even with a bad key” posted by Mr. Hardware seemed promising. I really like the soothing quality of his voice as he uses a sing-song tone to walk the view through the processes steps.

I’m not good at this stuff, and I have the barrier of not liking it. I knew that 4 easy steps sounded too good to be true and 15 seconds didn’t seem likely. I learned a little bit from both, I felt pretty prepared. To be on the safe side, I watched both videos and took my own notes documenting each, what some people might think to be intuitive step, and came up with 12 Steps. In case someone found this post by googling re-keying kwikset locks, I’ll list them here. They are a combination of what I learned from watching the office video and the very helpful and non-shaming Mr. Hardware:

  1. Keep Door open – make sure you have another way to get into the house
  2. The lock should be in the ‘locked’ position. Both the top and the bottom.
  3. Insert current key
  4. Turn 90 degrees to 3:00 o’clock.
  5. Insert pin fully and firmly into hole while the original key is in the lock
  6. Remove pin first – before removing current key
  7. Remove current key
  8. Insert new key

(make sure new key is fully inserted. Edge of key touches the face of the lock)

  1. Without pushing or pulling rotate to 180 degrees (counter clockwise) to 9:00 o’clock
  2. Rotate new key again to 3:00 o’clock
  3. Pull the key to make sure it will NOT come out in this position. If it comes out at 3:00 o’clock something is wrong.
  4. Turn back to starting position. Lock is now rekeyed, new key should work.

 

Did it work as easily as 4 easy steps and 15 seconds promised? Not exactly. Stay tuned and I’ll post an update.

 

 

 

How Long Does it Take to Change a Lock?

 

I provide a Time Management class. Spoiler alert – the course doesn’t focus on how to get more into your day, but rather to change the participant’s perception of time. With the advancement of technology, while we can work anytime, it seems we are working ALL the time. That’s unfortunate.

In what I hope is a perception-changing workshop, the focus of the workshop is to get more out of the days you work, not necessarily put more hours in. I’ll pose a question to the class . . .”how long do you think it takes to change a lock?” The group will shout out “15 minutes” “a couple of hours” “1/2 a day” etc.

The first criteria is to know the frame of reference the person has when they think of a lock. Is it the lock shown above?

is it this one?

or this one?

 

Follow this thread, you’ll soon understand why Home Depot is open for 24 hours.

 

Should We Post Weekly? Bi-Weekly?

The blog The Dots, and the process of connecting the dots, is not a forced activity. Concepts we hope may inspire thought and dialogue or influence positive work behaviors are also posted in our Podcast, our YouTube Channel, LinkedIn Articles and in our NLAChicago Report.  We post based on where the audience may best receive the information considering the content and by listening to audience preferences. This flexibility has worked for us. As the world changes, we’ll no doubt likely change again.  When I’m greeted with a demand for communication or to meet a deadline with no teeth, I sometimes reply with:

“the creative process is nurtured and not demanded.”

That comment is often met with a bit of perplexed contemplation.  It makes an impact though. It gives me some space to continue working on a project versus writing a report that demonstrates I’m working on a project. It also  helps me to protect the creatives and engineers doing the work. Such is The power of words.

It’s a true statement. The creative process is nurtured.  Most of the work world today is trying to innovate and problem solve. Measurements of success that worked in an Industrial Age aren’t the most effective any longer.

To further define ‘nurture’ I lifted and paraphrased from dictionary.com are:

‘to foster’

 ‘to feed and protect’

‘to support and encourage’

‘to raise up’

So why so deadline driven when working with idea development? Is the deadline real? ie we will get funding if we develop something by this date, is it customer driven ie we will lose a customer if we don’t do this activity and this date.

If the deadline is real, I have a couple of suggestions: meet it . . . or . . . push back. Pushing back is an option when your relationships are strong and a partnership exists. If you need to convince an investor that progress is being made, have them observe the progress vs stopping progress to report.

Daily, weekly or impromptu huddles are more productive than perfectly formatted, polished reports delivered on time, which may or may not be read.

Consider hiring a meeting scribe, and important role that is often overlooked. Someone to capture ideas and nuances is a critical success factor. This is a great job for a college intern, an apprentice or even a contract writer.

Demonstrate to your investors that progress is being made and great things will be achieved. Create a partnership of trust by communicating regularly and fluidly. If your relationship with your client or prospect is strong (if you want a competitive advantage it should be) keep demonstrating progress along the way, show milestones, allow them to be part of the problem-solving process. Demonstrate accountability and transparency on all levels.

You’ll have a great story to tell around how you’ve achieved success (or what you learned when you missed the mark) highlighting the challenges, roadblocks, and lessons learned. You’ll have a strong foundation for future success, sound relationships bonded through positively solving challenges, learning from each other, holding each other up, removing barriers and depending upon each other letting the best idea,  guided by the companies vision and edited by its values, win.

2017 Year-End Reflection

During this time of frantic year-end promotions, rather than riding the wave of promotion and joining in, my thought is it’s time to pause and reflect. I even saw one post from an executive coach that said ‘next year starts now.’ No it doesn’t, next year starts next year. Now is now. I’m pretty sure about that.

If you have a chance, take time to consider the questions listed below. Think about them for yourself, your business, your team, your organization, your family, your friendships, your state in life. You might enjoy the exercise.

THE YEAR PAST

  • What went Well?
  • How did you grow this past year?
  • What were your peak moments, and why?
  • What’s not working?

Wrap up your year by giving it a theme “2017 was the year of _______________”

THE YEAR AHEAD

  • What do you want more of?
  • What action steps will you take?
  • What kind of person do you want to be?
  • Who will you connect more with?
  • What’s your mantra (or word) for 2018?

 

Choosing a Word or a phrase to guide your year can be a great way to stay grounded. I learned this tactic from an executive I worked with a few years ago. I’ve found the process to be so powerful I do it each year. I shared the idea with friends who’ve enjoyed it. Each year we’ll discuss what our new word will be and reflect on the previous year’s word.

This year my word is Open. I chose the word pretty quickly without realizing how powerful it is. It’s a great theme, ‘open to ideas, open to failure, open to possibilities, open to being wrong, open to different revenue streams, open to partnerships,  open to conversations, open to connecting. . . Open.

I hope you enjoy every minute of this year as you plan to embark upon the next.

 

photo credit: Tephramiriam Communications, Printers Row, Chicago, IL 2017

 

 

 

It’s Always the Process that is Broken, not the People that are at Fault

I went through the 6 Sigma immersion process at GE in the 90s under the Jack Welch regime. We were taught,  ‘when you are looking at systems and analyzing for defects and inefficiencies; always look for the gaps in the processes. Do not seek ways to blame the people in the process. This thought struck me deeply. I find one of the reasons we have process gaps and systems breakdowns is we are too quick to blame people – people on every level. The people who do the work, the people who design the systems and infrastructure, the leaders in charge. We blame the users for being unable to use the system. When you blame the people they tend to be less than transparent, they tend to try to present the best information available and minimize any potential flaws. In short, people who feel it is not safe to expose potential challenges will not expose them.

I try to use the mantra of ‘it’s always the process, it’s never the people’ when engaging in a new project. This philosophy has gotten me invited in to tough projects that need a successful outcome. Ensuring people that I know they are very bright, work hard and do the best they can with the systems and processes they have creates a deeper dialogue. Because I am authentic, it creates trust.

Do I get frustrated with people? Sure. Who doesn’t?

Here’s a recent example. I hired a Virtual Assistant (VA) to help with several administrative tasks. Keeping track of my appointments and schedule changes can be daunting. To have someone help me stay on top of this is such a big relief. I have 2 to 3 appointments a week – but they are critically important. I’m meeting with executives and influencers. I’m  building relationships, I’m building trust.  I cannot drop the ball.

The process steps include:

  1. Alicia makes a connection and convinces someone to meet with her.
  2. ideally the meeting is face to face
  3. if the meeting is not face to face it is a virtual video meeting (Skype, GoTo Meeting) or a phone call
  4. There are time zones to be aware of
  5. People may have to change times which will create juggling. The most ideal situation is to keep the original time and venue
  6. Alicia sends an email containing suggested times and a suggested venue to initiate a meeting.
  7. The VA is cc’d in the email.
  8. The recipient is notified the VA is being cc’d and it is explained that the VA will help secure the meeting and send a meeting invite relieving us both of the responsibility to do so.
  9. The recipient replies to the email, selects a time and venue.
  10. The VA sends a meeting invite within 24 hours.

Those are the steps – but it wasn’t happening. The process breakdown happened at step 10. A couple of days had gone by. I was trying to secure a meeting with an important contact. Steps 1- 9 occurred but step 10 remained stagnant. I noticed it once.

I sent an email to the VA cc’ing her supervisor ‘hey was this meeting planner ever sent?’ The planner was sent immediately after prompting. The meeting was secured. I was frustrated but let it go. Things happen.

A week later, it happened again. Now I’m frustrated. What am I paying for? Why is this happening? If I have to follow up on the meeting this eliminates my need for assistance. I flourish under the infrastructure of sound processes. If I can count on my VA to execute, I am freed up to secure more meetings and work on many other things.

After the second occurrence I was prepared to have a harsh conversation with the VA. Then I remembered ‘it’s always the process, never the people.’ Where could the breakdown be in the process? The VA appears to want to do a good job, and appears eager to help. Most of the time, tasks are executed really well. What’s going on here?

Getting grounded, releasing my frustration, I explain the situation to the supervisor. The supervisor looks into the situation and uncovers the email is not being checked daily. With a frequency of 2 to 3 meetings a week, it is understandable that the email is not being checked daily. There is often no meeting activity. After understanding that it is critical to do so, a process of checking emails daily is implemented.

Remember: it’s always the process that is broken, never the people. Doing so will engage your employees and colleagues.  It will create a culture of looking for solutions vs. looking for ways to assign blame. It will create a culture of transparency, agility and trust.

Now I want to go fix that bridge . . .

Who Can I Tell?

 

Alicia Dale Cubs Trophy1

As a native Chicago South Sider,  I have so few people to share my photo with of me and the 2016 Chicago Cubs World Series Trophy. Some of you will know what being a South Sider means immediately and many of you won’t get it at all. A wonderful thing happened in Chicago.  Isn’t all of Chicago celebrating and sharing in the success? Depends. Depends on where you live and where you’re from.

Growing up on the South Side makes you by birth a White Sox fan and immediately puts you at odds with the North Side. There are a few isolated South Siders willing to eschew all and root for the Cubs. The few I know are very happy about the win and I’ve shared my photo individually with them on my phone.

There is such a big South Side/North Side divide that I joke even when I moved downtown I couldn’t get north of Madison Street, the 0 (zero) street that divides Chicago. I went on to say that I would’ve had to get special dispensation from Mayor Daley, the ultimate Chicago South Sider. Getting it, long-time Chicagoans laugh.

Known as a brave one, I’m not brave enough to post my photo on Facebook where the event will mostly be met with radio silence, a thumbs up from the long suffering South Side Chicago Cubs fans and glee from those out of the state and out of the country that have no idea this divide exists, celebrating the joy of this extraordinary  win.

When the Cleveland Indians captured the lead, when the rain delay started, I thought “there really is a curse”. Resigned, I fell asleep.

Then the magic happened, the most unlikely player Jason Heyward, used the opportunity of the rain to meet with the team,  a time usually used to check self-phones or evaluate individual behavior or just wait. Heyward used that time in his own words ‘to remind the team who they are’.

Listening to  Anthony Rizzo’s, a cancer survivor, vulnerable, emotion-filled rally speech, I note the diversity of the team and had the realization that none of these men are native Chicagoans. They are not part of the divide. Rizzo acknowledges all who contributed – a real team and pays special homage to David Russo, oldest player soon to retire. I admire the diversity and inclusion.

Chicago’s most famous and loveable Cub fun, Bill Murray, gave his extra ticket to a random fan, a female. The diversity, vulnerability and inclusion is admirable all around.

The commitment to the South Side/North Side intolerance and divide resonates all around me as we currently argue gender, political and societal issues. Hard to believe, these divides are even deeper.  I deliberately chose the word argue and not debate. In a debate an effort is made to understand the opposing side, to listen to persuade, to come to a new, more informed conclusion.

With the Cubs win, I do not deny my South Side heritage when I focus on the inspiration and not the divide. I am enriched by the ability to embrace a new perspective and be vulnerable to what could be.

 I hope to take this 108 year-old lesson into dialogues around gender, societal and political issues. Join me.  Something wonderful is on the other side.

 

Take a Break . . .

walking path

It’s important. Give yourself time to reflect. If you celebrate Holidays at year-end, celebrate them. Enjoy being fully present in all you are doing. Do more than just go though the motions.  Evaluate the year. Treasure today. Enjoy a walk in the sunshine, in the snow, in the rain. Express gratitude everywhere and in every way you can.  Be with your family, connect deeply with friends. Rest. Restore. Prepare for 2017. Remember why you are doing all you do.

That’s what we’re going to do. Check back in 2017 for more blog posts, insights, a revised website and new service offerings.

Rest. Rejuvenate. Restore.

 

Purple

 purple-rippleListen or read the text below . ..

It’s surreal to believe that prior November 9, 2016  the biggest controversy discussed in my life was how I could be happy for the Cubs win as a native south-side Chicagoan. 

Then it happened. And the world erupted. Or maybe not. The domestic and international markets fluctuated but didn’t crash.

Did I vote for Trump? Nope. Was I crazy about voting for Hillary? Nope. Did I believe the system was functioning optimally? Nope. I voted for what I thought would influence the best change, however I understood from experience that the change would be minimal and slow.  I understood there would be gains but probably even more painful losses as evidenced in the implementation of Obamacare. Now while I don’t have to worry about a pre-existing condition I can barely afford the premiums and the deductibles of plan that won’t cover much. I get the pain. I get the anger.

President-elect Trump listened deeply and reacted in a way that mobilized many.  We have to respect that. If we were smart we’d learn from it versus continuing to debate it.

This was most recently evidenced by the well-meaning letter the cast of Hamilton read to Vice President- elect Pence. The intention of the letter may have been good but reading the letter to the Vice President- elect in front of the audience was in poor taste.

What if the cast of Hamilton used my favorite soft skill, ‘manners‘? What if they welcomed Vice President- elect to the performance? What if they thanked him for his presence in front of the audience? What if they diplomatically suggested this might be the beginning of a healing dialogue and perhaps some much needed change? Would Vice-president elect Pence have been open to a continued dialogue?

“When they go low, we go high.” Not this time. As artists and communicators the cast of Hamilton did not best use their enviable gifts to influence and persuade. Like President-elect Trump artists’ voices have power. Artists have the opportunity to influence change.

The ship has sailed. This is the new administration.

  • If we don’t like the people in the offices we can at least respect the offices they hold.
  • If we don’t understand the political process, we should challenge ourselves to understand it.
  • If we do understand the process and we think it’s broken, we should challenge ourselves to fix it.
  • If the process is working but does not reflect our country’s values, we should work to change it.

I understand red and blue make purple.

Let’s work toward purple.

 

 

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